Saturday, September 19, 2009

Einstein Quote

One of the strongest motives that lead men to art and science is escape from everyday life with its painful crudity and hopeless dreariness, from the fetters of one's own ever-shifting desires.

5 comments:

Mariana Soffer said...

"[T]he art instinct proper," he writes, "is not a single genetically driven impulse similar to the liking for sweetness but a complicated ensemble of impulses - sub-instincts, we might say - that involve responses to the natural environment, to life's likely threats and opportunities, the sheer appeal of colors or sounds, social status, intellectual puzzles, extreme technical difficulty, erotic interests, and even costliness. There is no reason to hope that this haphazard concatenation of impulses, pleasures, and capacities can be made to form a pristine rational system."

frogponder said...

Okay, I'm going to have to have that first morning cup of coffee to think this over!

Back when I tried to get certified I wanted to teach middle school science. I love the great sense of mystery that accompanies science in the things we don't know yet.

Beth said...

Love the Einstein quote, and I think that makes perfect sense. Looking at art, reading a book, pondering a scientific phenomenon...all work our minds and get us to think beyond our everyday reality. The trick is to find the excitement in the mundane. I've always believed that wonder is everywhere, but sometimes you have to make an effort to see it. Hugs, Beth

lelocolon said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
lelocolon said...

Sorry about the delete, I am having a bad morning.

Great post, I agree with Einstein on that one. Mariana and Beth also gave me something to consider. Today even though I feel like frogponder after too much drinking last night, I do see the need to create and to escape reality more than ever before.